Enersource Corporation


Company name: Enersource Corporation
Country: Canada
Province: Ontario
City: Mississauga
Address: 3240 Mavis Road
ZIP code: L5C 3K1
Phone: 9052739050
Site: www.enersource.com
On this company found complaints: 0

Description of the company

Enersource Corporation
3240 Mavis Road, Mississauga, Ontario, L5C 3K1, Canada
9052739050


Enersource Corporation and its regulated affiliate, Enersource Hydro Mississauga, have a history in Mississauga that stretches back to 1917 and the creation of Toronto Township Hydro. Enersource Hydro Mississauga is the successor to the electricity distribution business of the Mississauga Hydro Electric Commission, later incorporated as Hydro Mississauga Corporation, commonly known by the operating name Hydro Mississauga. To understand Enersource Hydro Mississauga s history you have to understand the combined history of its three predecessors. Prior to 1974 the core of Mississauga was known as Toronto Township. Within this township were the two villages of Streetsville and Port Credit, and each of these distinct communities operated their own independent electricity and water utilities. These original three utilities were known as Toronto Township Hydro, Streetsville Public Utilities Commission (PUC) and Port Credit PUC. With the formation of the City of Mississauga in 1974, Toronto Township Hydro was renamed Hydro Mississauga and in 1977 the three electricity utilities amalgamated as one Hydro Commission. Thomas Edison perfected the electric light in 1879 and then Nicholas Tesla discovered the principle of rotating magnetic fields, which spawned the development of steam and water-driven electric generators. As early as 1894, villagers of Streetsville were enjoying lighting on their streets. The power supply for these lamps came from a pole line, which stretched north along Mississauga Road from the tiny village of Erindale. In Erindale, a power company had set up a temporary steam plant producing small amounts of electricity. Around 1900, this practice was very common. Many private industrialists were burning coal to generate steam power. The great Niagara Falls power dam was also being developed. Private money had already built transmission lines stretching outwards from the falls throughout several parts of southern Ontario. Lines were being constructed at a furious pace. Private competitors fought one another for slim profit margins and were bought and sold at a dizzying pace. Engineering standards were poor and blackouts frequent. In 1906, the government responded by forming a public power company Ontario Hydro. Around this time, Mississauga s local government, the Toronto Township council, was dealing with a request from a private operator called the Erindale Power Company. This company wanted to transmit power in and through the municipality and had an ambitious scheme to dam the Credit River at Erindale. The company was planning to build the $250,000 dam and a 900 foot tunnel directing water flow under Erindale Village, southwards to a power plant, then back into the river. Meanwhile, Streetsville became increasingly unhappy with the spotty reliability of its power supplier and decided to strike out on its own. By 1907, Streetsville completed its own waterpower project on the Credit River. Three years later, Erindale Power Company s facility began operating. The dam formed a picturesque lake of 125 acres. It increased water levels to a height of 60 feet above huge turbines that produced supply at 13,000 volts. Wooden poles stretched out from the power plant along Dundas Street to serve customers as far east as Swansea, a community in east Toronto. Unfortunately for investors and customers, part of the dam broke away due to some poor concrete construction. Eventually the facility closed down, never realizing its potential capacity, and unable to compete with low cost power which was now coming from Niagara Falls. Ontario Hydro was now rapidly expanding its own lines. Power was being transmitted directly from a Dundas, Ontario switching station to Port Credit. Ontario Hydro promised that capacity would be expanded by building a substation at Port Credit to serve the growing market in Brampton, Streetsville, New Toronto, and other surrounding communities. The station was built in 1911 and the new north-south line, 510 poles in all, stretched up Centre Road, which we know today as Hurontario Street, or Hwy.10. This small brick substation building still stands as part of our Hydro Mississauga Stavebank office property. With insatiable demand for electricity, towns across Ontario began entering into contracts with Ontario Hydro to provide for their electricity distribution needs. In fact, Mississauga has the distinction of being the first town to contract with Ontario Hydro this way. On February 9, 1917, concerned with rising costs for Ontario Hydro distribution services and growing demand for electricity, the Toronto Township Hydro Commission was formed at a special meeting of Toronto Township Council. It is this date that marks the commencement of Enersource Hydro Mississauga s long and very successful 90 years serving the electricity needs of the City of Mississauga. Toronto Township Hydro expanded with the growing town serving the populous areas, but not all of what we now know as Mississauga. Outlying areas continued to be served by Ontario Hydro under a July 1, 1922 by-law, #949, which authorized the establishment of Rural Hydro. It was not until January 1, 1964 that the Township Council obtained a private bill of the Legislature to incorporate the "Voted Area" and Rural Hydro as one Commission. Streetsville PUC also continued to operate independently of Ontario Hydro and Toronto Township Hydro, supplying its own needs for many years from the small generator in its Credit River power plant. It was not until 1934 that Streetsville PUC relented and finally began to buy some wholesale power from Ontario Hydro. Remarkably, the Streetsville power dam continued to operate until the late 60s as a peak saving tool. One of Streetsville PUC s legendary stewards was John Temple. This man was a jack of all trades with the Commission, connecting services, reading meters, making power line improvements and apparently, with the aid of his familiar bicycle, rushing to the scene of trouble during bad storms. The 1950s and 1960s were important formative years for Toronto Township Hydro s long-term strategy with respect to managing growth. In this period the utility and Township Council worked together to implement policy requiring that wiring for all new subdivisions be placed underground. The utility was a leader in these underground engineering techniques and one of the first utilities to increase its operating voltage on distribution circuits from 4,160 to 13,800 volts. "Live Better Electrically" was also a popular theme of the time and as a keen marketer of this heating option, Toronto Township was the first municipality in Canada to have 1,000 electrically heated homes. Toronto Township Hydro Commission offices were at one time located in Port Credit. After the Port Credit Commission was formed, Toronto Township moved into the Town Hall and then relocated to a property on Dundas Street just west of Hurontario. The move to an Ontario Hydro vacated switching station at 2325 Hurontario Street (northeast corner of Hurontario St. and The Queensway) took place in 1950. Following the 1977 amalgamation with Streetsville and Port Credit, Hydro Mississauga employees worked from two locations, a head office at 2325 Hurontario Street and an engineering and works building at 3240 Mavis Road. All employees were later consolidated at the present 3240 Mavis Road location, following the completion of a building expansion at this site in 1980. The 1970s and early 1980s were a period of explosive growth in Mississauga, and this centralized Mavis Road location proved to be ideal for the co-ordinated effort that has been necessary to construct the modern electricity system that exists today. Many great people have played significant roles in building Enersource Hydro Mississauga to its present status as one of the premier electricity utilities in Ontario. While there have been many outstanding contributors on the utility s appointed Commissions over the years, three individuals certainly stood the test of time with exemplary service. These names include Alan Bradley who, for 27 years, served and Chaired the Hydro Commission. And there is 32-year hydro veteran Mayor Hazel McCallion who, after 8 years with the Streetsville Public Utilities Commission, oversaw that operation become debt free in September 1995. During her current 24 years on the Hydro Mississauga Commission she accomplished the same at Hydro Mississauga. And finally Ron Starr, who, in May 2000, after 19 years, became the first Chair of the Board of Directors of the newly incorporated and commercially restructured utility. Over the past 90 years, from the formation of Toronto Township Hydro to the present day, there were only six Hydro Mississauga general managers. Robert Parkinson served from our formation until 1947, James Gray served from 1947 until 1949, Ronald Starr served the next 13 years, Bert Fleming served for 25 years, Jerry Mirka for 3, and Karl Wahl for 11. In January 2000, with the restructuring of Hydro Mississauga from a utility to a fully incorporated company under the Ontario Business Corporations Act, the title of GM gave way to President. Ron E. Starr filled this role in this first year until November 2000, when Mississauga City Manager, David O Brien, was seconded to serve as President and Chief Executive Officer of Enersource Corporation, overseeing development of the utility s emerging competitive business activities. In May 2001, Mr. O Brien was able to return to his job with the city and was replaced by Gunars Ceksters. While our long history is rich with successes, Enersource Corporation is looking to the future; advancing the development of distributed generation to add capacity to the Ontario supply mix and driving the conservation agenda to lower our overall reliance on power generation.